Magazines Motoring Classics

Motoring Classics Summer 2015

News of the Land Rover Defender’s impending demise has probably even reached the little green of Mars by now, such is the level of buying, restoring (and even stealing!) it’s reputedly created. We report on the must-see exhibition JLR has created in celebration of the model and its forebears; also on the astonishing 130-strong Dunsfold Collection of Land Rovers that recently achieved charitable status, and can hopefully soon be housed in the dedicated museum it deserves.

Motoring Classics Summer 2015

The 1948 reconstruction line is appropriately housed slap in the middle of current Defender production.

Publication Information
Cover Price: Free
Page Count: 20 pages
Subject: Aviation, Cars, Motorsport, People
Format: Digital (pdf)
Frequency: Quarterly
Publisher: British Motor Heritage
The Best-Loved 4×4 By Far

Download British Motor Heritage’s Summer 2015 Motoring Classics Magazine below!

Motoring Classics Summer 2015

News of the Land Rover Defender’s impending demise has probably even reached the little green of Mars by now, such is the level of buying, restoring (and even stealing!) it’s reputedly created. We report on the must-see exhibition JLR has created in celebration of the model and its forebears; also on the astonishing 130-strong Dunsfold Collection of Land Rovers that recently achieved charitable status, and can hopefully soon be housed in the dedicated museum it deserves.

One museum already firmly in place and recently extended is the Sammy Miller motorcycle one. Nestling unobtrusively in the New Forest it is an absolute treat for the bikers among us. Go whenever you can and, like me, you might be lucky enough to meet the man himself – an 81 year old whirlwind of energy, still riding and even competing!

Yet another organisation busy protecting our automotive (and aviation) legacy is Bicester Heritage; the consortium that’s acquired the best preserved of all Britain’s WWI/II airfields and is busy turning it into a hive of complementary traditional skills, and the perfect place for enthusiasts to meet, talk and even ride, drive and fly. Another truly fabulous project that deserves our full support.

This issue’s Classic Character is Cecil Kimber – aka ‘Mr MG’. His fascinating story is one of skill and determination, and it’s so sad his life was cut short in a freak rail accident and he has arguably never had the credit he deserved.

Neither perhaps has Reliant, the subject of our Missing Moniker, which warrants considerable recognition for putting a fibreglass roof over many a former motorcyclist’s head (courtesy of its unique three-wheelers), and bringing us the trend-setting Scimitar GTE that still turns heads nearly 50 years on.

It’s too late to change John Betjeman’s view of Slough, but our feature on its automotive contribution might make a few of you see it in a new light, while that on electric cars proves such power is far from new in the motoring world.

Happy Reading!

Gordon Bruce, Editor

For all the latest news, offers and great tips … Motoring Classics

Contents
Dealer Spotlight: TR Bitz at Aerodrome Garage

Nearly 40 years of buying, selling, servicing, restoring andbreaking Triumph TRs (models 2 to 6 inclusive) entitles John Sykes to make some mighty impressive claims for his internationally-renowned company.

News From BMH

Managing Director John Yea provides updates on all fronts.

The Best-Loved 4×4 By Far

Suddenly, everybody’s talking Land Rovers. The word is out that UK production of the world’s most iconic 4×4 is finally to cease an amazing 68 years after Maurice Wilkes famously outlined his brainchild on the sands of Anglesey, and enthusiasts are snapping them up left right and centre before it’s too late. New ones, old ones, concours examples and basket cases, they’re all now of interest.

Made In Slough!

John Betjeman wrote a derisive poem about it – ‘Come friendly bombs and fall on Slough…..’; it was home to David Brent’s imaginary stationery firm: and some wag created the bumper sticker ‘Happiness is Slough in my rear view mirror’. It may therefore surprise you that we car guys have much to thank the town for.

Motoring Classics in Motorsport

British Motor Heritage MD John Yea reports from the cockpit.

Plugging An Old Idea

Some owners of shiny new VW e-ups or Nissan Leafs may be under the impression they are revolutionary, but few things are truly new in this world. The electric car’s (first) heyday was c.1900. Twenty years later it was discarded for being ‘too expensive, too slow and having too short a range’. Sound familiar?

Missing Moniker: Reliant

It’s easy to be confused by Reliant, the unique Midlands-based car company that survived an impressive 66 years and brought us cars as diverse as: the three-wheeled Regal that was primarily aimed at bikers who could drive it on a motorcycle licence; and the sporting four-wheeled Scimitar GTE that found favour with Princess Anne and such stars of the day as Noel Edmonds, David Nixon and Rita Tushingham.

Classic Character: Cecil Kimber (1888-1945)

The MG brand has been kicked from pillar to post since its inception, yet the famous Octagon badge remains a symbol of a golden age of British car manufacture. Despite this, few people outside the motoring sphere are truly au fait with the company’s founder – the enigmatic Cecil Kimber.

Bicester’s Alternative Village

These days, the once sleepy Oxfordshire market hamlet of Bicester is best known for Bicester Village; the UK’s largest shopping centre outside London, where 6 million people per annum obtain their retail therapy. However, something yet more innovative and exciting is stirring on the other side of this otherwise unremarkable town – Bicester Heritage. Based on a former RAF airfield, it aims to become the Mecca for our classic vehicle movement, and has already unobtrusively progressed a long way towards that goal.

Miller’s Motorcycles

The Sammy Miller Motorcycle Museum nestles unassumingly among the trees of the New Forest, giving little indication of the hundreds of treasures displayed within. One of the best such collections in the world, it is a stunning tribute to motorcycling in general and Sammy Miller in particular – one of biking’s finest ever competitors.

About British Motor Heritage
British Motor Heritage

British Motor Heritage Limited was established in 1975 to support owners and the marketplace by putting genuine components for classic British cars back into manufacture, using original tools wherever possible. Since 2001, when the company was acquired from BMW, it has been successfully run as an independently owned company.

British Motor Heritage is the largest organisation of its type in the world. With access to unparalleled knowledge, authentic production information and original drawings and patterns, the company manufactures previously unobtainable body parts for British classic cars.

It occupies a unique position since it assembles 32 derivatives of body shells and has built total production volume of over 7,000 for the MGB, MGR V8, MG Midget, Austin-Healey Sprite, Triumph TR6, Original Mini and Mini Clubman using original press tools and assembly jigs.

Website: https://www.bmh-ltd.com/

Tex Automotive

Tex Motor Accessories have been manufactured in England for over fifty years, and many of our products are still produced in our factory in Witney on the original tooling.

Since their first appearance on British cars in 1947, Tex products evolved over the years to keep in step with changing car designs. The current range includes wipers and mirrors that were original equipment on a huge range of Austin, Ford, Morris, MG, Triumph, Vauxhall, etc. from 1974 to 1983.

Tex are also major distributors of the Renovo car care product range (specialising in hood refurbishment) and Samco Silicone hose Kits.

Website: https://texautomotive.com/

Copyright Information

Motoring Classics is the printed and online publication of British Motor Heritage and its retail trading arm.

Motoring Classics reproduction in whole or any part of any text, photograph or illustration without written permission of the publisher is strictly prohibited.

The publisher makes every effort to ensure the magazine’s contents are correct but can accept no responsibility for any effects from errors or omissions.

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