Magazines Motoring Classics

Motoring Classics Spring 2019

With legislation against petrol and diesel-engined vehicles becoming more stringent by the minute, today’s new car buyers are increasingly being herded down the avenue of low or zero emission forms of transport. Though the trend has yet to directly affect the classic car fraternity, some owners are taking matters into their own hands, and specialist companies offering electric conversions for everything from Fiat 500s to Ford Mustangs are springing up to service the escalating demand.

Motoring Classics Spring 2019

There is a fear among some classic car owners that environmental legislation will ultimately prevent their traditionally engined vehicles from being driven.

Publication Information
Cover Price: Free
Page Count: 20 pages
Subject: Aviation, Cars, Motorsport, People
Format: Digital (pdf)
Frequency: Quarterly
Publisher: British Motor Heritage
Leading the Charge

Download British Motor Heritage’s Spring 2019 Motoring Classics Magazine below!

Motoring Classics Spring 2019

With legislation against petrol and diesel-engined vehicles becoming more stringent by the minute, today’s new car buyers are increasingly being herded down the avenue of low or zero emission forms of transport. Though the trend has yet to directly affect the classic car fraternity, some owners are taking matters into their own hands, and specialist companies offering electric conversions for everything from Fiat 500s to Ford Mustangs are springing up to service the escalating demand. We’ve been exploring the current options.

Despite not competing for 25 years, Team Lotus remains the 5th most successful manufacturer in F1 history. Since founder Colin Chapman’s untimely death, the Lotus phenomenon has been kept alive by his son Clive’s operation – Classic Team Lotus. It recently moved into smart new premises and if you’re an F1 fan we’d definitely advise a visit.

Another feast for motorsport loving eyes will be The Silverstone Experience, which is scheduled to launch in late spring. It’s an innovative blend of museum, exhibition and interactive displays regarding the world-famous circuit’s history and, if our sneak preview was anything to go by, this exciting new national attraction is destined to delight racing enthusiasts of all ages.

The Red Arrows are a British institution par excellence. They are arguably the greatest aerobatic display team in the world, that’s carried out almost 5,000 public performances around the globe since its foundation in 1964. We were privileged to visit last year’s team, during what was the organisation’s busiest season to date.

This issue’s Classic Character is Freddie March, the duke who founded the incomparable Goodwood motor racing circuit and was a pioneer on many fronts during his fascinating lifetime. Our Missing Moniker on this occasion is the charming little Meadows Frisky, a British microcar that achieved modest sales in period but examples of which now fetch serious five figure sums. Add in news from British Motor Heritage, and of its racing team’s feverish preparation for the season ahead, and there’s hopefully something of interest for you all.

Enjoy!

Gordon Bruce, Editor

For all the latest news, offers and great tips … Motoring Classics

Contents
Classic Character: Frederick Charles Gordon Lennox, 9th Duke Of Richmond (1904-1989)

Though you could almost fill this page with the duke’s titles, he scorned them, preferring to be known as Freddie March. The youngest of four children, he adored his brother Charles, sharing his passion for cars, motorcycles and aeroplanes, and together they frequently cycled to the home of Henry Royce in nearby West Wittering. Sadly, Freddie was just 15 when Charles died at Archangel while supporting the White Russian army.

Leading The Charge

The pace of electrification in the automotive world is picking up markedly, and the march of progress is no longer confined to new cars built by household name motor manufacturers and Johnny come-latelys such as Tesla, Venturi and Rimac. No, purists close thy eyes, it’s now invading our world of classic cars, and could have already affected anything from a Fiat 500 to Ford Mustang near you.

News From BMH

Managing Director John Yea reveals all.

Classic Team Lotus Has A Smart New Home: Motoring Classics paid a visit

It is extraordinary to think that the last Grand Prix contested by Team Lotus was the Australian race of 1994, yet it still ranks as the 5th most successful F1 manufacturer of all time behind Ferrari, McLaren, Williams and Mercedes. Such was the genius of its founder Colin Chapman, that his seemingly endless series of innovative chassis designs helped Lotus snare no less than 79 race victories, plus 7 Constructors’ and 6 Drivers’ Championships.

Missing Moniker: Meadows Frisky

Bon vivant Captain Raymond Flower was the author of over 20 books on subjects as diverse as: Lloyds of London, of which he was an underwriter; the Chianti region of Italy, where he eventually lived in a 1000-year-old castello; and motorsport, of which his personal experience included placings in Alpine rallies and RAC Tourist Trophy races. He was also the father of the Meadows Frisky microcar.

The Silverstone Experience: An exciting new, highly-innovative attraction for motorsport fans

Silverstone Circuit, the ‘Home Of British Motor Racing’ and, to date, the venue for no less than 52 British Grands Prix, is an area brimming with history. Back in the early 1100s it was the site of Luffield Abbey, home to an order of Benedictine Monks, while the track’s famous Becketts corner and Chapel curve draw their names from the chapel of Thomas à Becket built in memory of the murdered Archbishop of Canterbury.

Best Of The Best: The Red Arrows

The editor first met the Red Arrows (aka The Reds) as an excited student at RAE Farnborough in 1968, but topped that experience by a country mile last year during an unforgettable visit to RAF Scampton.

Motoring Classics in Motorsport

British Motor Heritage MD John Yea previews his forthcoming racing season.

About British Motor Heritage
British Motor Heritage

British Motor Heritage Limited was established in 1975 to support owners and the marketplace by putting genuine components for classic British cars back into manufacture, using original tools wherever possible. Since 2001, when the company was acquired from BMW, it has been successfully run as an independently owned company.

British Motor Heritage is the largest organisation of its type in the world. With access to unparalleled knowledge, authentic production information and original drawings and patterns, the company manufactures previously unobtainable body parts for British classic cars.

It occupies a unique position since it assembles 32 derivatives of body shells and has built total production volume of over 7,000 for the MGB, MGR V8, MG Midget, Austin-Healey Sprite, Triumph TR6, Original Mini and Mini Clubman using original press tools and assembly jigs.

Website: https://www.bmh-ltd.com/

Tex Automotive

Tex Motor Accessories have been manufactured in England for over fifty years, and many of our products are still produced in our factory in Witney on the original tooling.

Since their first appearance on British cars in 1947, Tex products evolved over the years to keep in step with changing car designs. The current range includes wipers and mirrors that were original equipment on a huge range of Austin, Ford, Morris, MG, Triumph, Vauxhall, etc. from 1974 to 1983.

Tex are also major distributors of the Renovo car care product range (specialising in hood refurbishment) and Samco Silicone hose Kits.

Website: https://texautomotive.com/

Copyright Information

Motoring Classics is the printed and online publication of British Motor Heritage and its retail trading arm.

Motoring Classics reproduction in whole or any part of any text, photograph or illustration without written permission of the publisher is strictly prohibited.

The publisher makes every effort to ensure the magazine’s contents are correct but can accept no responsibility for any effects from errors or omissions.

Sending
User Review
0 (0 votes)

Leave a Comment