Magazines Motoring Classics

Motoring Classics Spring 2017

The very mention of M25 is sufficient to bring some drivers out in a rash of pink and yellow spots, so my advance apologies for making it the cover story for this edition. However, I hope you’ll agree that the statistics surrounding it do actually make pretty fascinating reading and, who knows, after absorbing our feature you may see the motorway in a whole new light.

Motoring Classics Spring 2017

In 1905 a Royal Commission floated the idea of an orbital road around the capital at a radius of 12 miles from its centre

Publication Information
Cover Price: Free
Page Count: 20 pages
Subject: Aviation, Cars, Motorsport, People
Format: Digital (pdf)
Frequency: Quarterly
Publisher: British Motor Heritage
The Road To Hell

Download British Motor Heritage’s Spring 2017 Motoring Classics Magazine below!

Motoring Classics Spring 2017

The very mention of M25 is sufficient to bring some drivers out in a rash of pink and yellow spots, so my advance apologies for making it the cover story for this edition. However, I hope you’ll agree that the statistics surrounding it do actually make pretty fascinating reading and, who knows, after absorbing our feature you may see the motorway in a whole new light the next time you’re locked solid somewhere along its 117 miles of asphalt and concrete – was that a pig that just flew by?!

Our larger than usual Missing Moniker is devoted to that quintessentially British marque Bristol. The additional three pages are to do justice not only to its unique history of trams, buses, taxis, aeroplanes and cars, but also the secret ‘dungeon’ that lies beneath its long-standing London showroom, and houses details of every motorcar it’s ever made.

Our Classic Character is an extraordinary gentleman who had a finger in just about every motoring pie of his time – yes, from being a founder of the AA to an ace racer on two, three and four wheels, Charles Jarrott was preeminent among the list of British-born automotive pioneers.

Few post-war aeroplanes have evoked such passion as Concorde – an aircraft that not only introduced military levels of supersonic flight to the world of the passenger airline, but proved that Britain and France can actually work in harmony when they really try. Our feature not only reminds us what an amazing technical feat it was, but that civil supersonic flight has actually stood still since it was conceived. It even reports on the serious possibility of a Concorde taking to the air once again – and how good would that be?!

This issue’s Dealer Spotlight concerns the pan-European concern of Anglo Parts, one of whose recent acquisitions is a little-known Dutch Jaguar retailer whose stock turned out to include items dating all the way back to the SS models of the ‘30s. Add in the latest news from British Motor Heritage itself, as well as details of its upcoming season of classic racing, and we hopefully have something to help all of you through the remaining winter evenings.

Happy reading!

Gordon Bruce, Editor

For all the latest news, offers and great tips … Motoring Classics

Contents
Dealer Spotlight: Anglo Parts

Anglo Parts is the latest classic car enterprise to join the ranks of British Motor Heritage ‘Approved Specialists’. As its managing director Marc van de Vijver remarked: “It was pointed out to us that we were the only large quality supplier of classic British car parts not on the list, so are happy to have put that matter right.”

M25 – The Road To Hell

You may not know (or care) that the infamous M25 motorway celebrated its 30th birthday on October 29 last year. It is doubtful if any other road in history has attracted an equivalent level of comment over time – much of it unrepeatable in polite company – but, like it or loathe it, there is no way the country could now sensibly function without it. Here Motoring Classics pays tribute to this unique 117 miles of highway, the astonishing facts and figures regarding which arguably justify their own edition of Trivial Pursuit.

Motoring Classics in Motorsport

British Motor Heritage MD John Yea previews his coming racing season.

Classic Character: Lieutenant Colonel Charles Jarrott OBE (1877-1944)

It often feels as if our pasts were shaped by just a few individuals, as the same monikers surface again and again. Certainly, if you investigate the pioneering days of motoring and motorsport, the name Charles Jarrott quickly rises to the surface.

(Temporarily) Missing Moniker: Bristol

The quintessentially British marque Bristol has been missing from the sales charts since 2011, but is due to bounce back with a new high-tech offering during 2017 – reason enough, we felt, to delve into the history of this extraordinary business, whose roots date back to the Bristol Tramways Company of the 1870s.

News From BMH

Managing Director John Yea reveals all.

Mach 2 Marvel

To this day, Concorde remains the only supersonic airliner to have achieved credible commercial operation and the world has been a far poorer place since it was forced into retirement in October 2003. Motoring Classics charts the rise and fall of one of the most amazing aircraft ever made and reports on the increasing hope that one might yet take to the skies again.

About British Motor Heritage
British Motor Heritage

British Motor Heritage Limited was established in 1975 to support owners and the marketplace by putting genuine components for classic British cars back into manufacture, using original tools wherever possible. Since 2001, when the company was acquired from BMW, it has been successfully run as an independently owned company.

British Motor Heritage is the largest organisation of its type in the world. With access to unparalleled knowledge, authentic production information and original drawings and patterns, the company manufactures previously unobtainable body parts for British classic cars.

It occupies a unique position since it assembles 32 derivatives of body shells and has built total production volume of over 7,000 for the MGB, MGR V8, MG Midget, Austin-Healey Sprite, Triumph TR6, Original Mini and Mini Clubman using original press tools and assembly jigs.

Website: https://www.bmh-ltd.com/

Tex Automotive

Tex Motor Accessories have been manufactured in England for over fifty years, and many of our products are still produced in our factory in Witney on the original tooling.

Since their first appearance on British cars in 1947, Tex products evolved over the years to keep in step with changing car designs. The current range includes wipers and mirrors that were original equipment on a huge range of Austin, Ford, Morris, MG, Triumph, Vauxhall, etc. from 1974 to 1983.

Tex are also major distributors of the Renovo car care product range (specialising in hood refurbishment) and Samco Silicone hose Kits.

Website: https://texautomotive.com/

Copyright Information

Motoring Classics is the printed and online publication of British Motor Heritage and its retail trading arm.

Motoring Classics reproduction in whole or any part of any text, photograph or illustration without written permission of the publisher is strictly prohibited.

The publisher makes every effort to ensure the magazine’s contents are correct but can accept no responsibility for any effects from errors or omissions.

Sending
User Review
0 (0 votes)

Leave a Comment