Magazines Motoring Classics

Motoring Classics Spring 2016

For many years those at the helm of classic motoring have vexed over what happens when they have departed for that great historic motor show in the sky. Will the old car wheel stop turning; what will happen to our treasured vehicles? In short, will the younger generations pick up the baton and drive with it? If the sentiments of our cover story ‘Junior Jockeys’ are anything to go by, I believe the movement is secure for a good while yet.

Motoring Classics Spring 2016

We spoke to a range of organisations actively involved in encouraging youngsters into the movement and catering for their needs.

Publication Information
Cover Price: Free
Page Count: 20 pages
Subject: Cars, Motorsport, People, Railway
Format: Digital (pdf)
Frequency: Quarterly
Publisher: British Motor Heritage
Junior Jockeys

Download British Motor Heritage’s Spring 2016 Motoring Classics Magazine below!

Motoring Classics Spring 2016

For many years those at the helm of classic motoring have vexed over what happens when they have departed for that great historic motor show in the sky. Will the old car wheel stop turning; what will happen to our treasured vehicles? In short, will the younger generations pick up the baton and drive with it? If the sentiments of our cover story ‘Junior Jockeys’ are anything to go by, I believe the movement is secure for a good while yet.

The venerable Austin 7 is one of the pillars of Britain’s motoring heritage. It has been many people’s introduction to the roads and continues to put smiles on faces, young and old. What’s perhaps less well known is the role it played in the creation of BMW, Nissan (née Datsun) Rosengart and even Jaguar, or the influence it had on the American and Australian markets of the day – it’s quite a story.

Those whose pulses race at the sight and sound of classic cars are invariably equally excited by historic trucks, military vehicles, aircraft and motorcycles. And to that list you can probably add steam trains. To mark the return of the incomparable Flying Scotsman to the tracks, we briefly reminisce about the first steam locomotive to break the magic 100mph barrier. Wait for the whistle and enjoy!

A large percentage of today’s drivers doubtless have little or no knowledge of micro/bubble cars. Our related feature therefore recalls the austerity that brought them into being and explores the charming little UK museum dedicated to the genre. Dealer Spotlight this time focuses on Mini Sport, the 48-year-old family business that has fingers in just about every classic Mini pie going, while this issue’s Classic Character concerns the extraordinary unsung life of Le Mans winner, war hero, engineer and automotive industrialist Major ‘Tony’ Rolt MC and Bar. Last but not least, our regular Missing Moniker feature is devoted to the fascinating and apparently soon-to-return German marque of Borgward.

Happy reading!

Gordon Bruce, Editor

For all the latest news, offers and great tips … Motoring Classics

Contents
Dealer Spotlight: Mini Sport

You’d be forgiven for thinking that Brian and Heather Harper created a master plan back in 1959 that’s since been instigated to the letter. The foundation was the immortal Issigonis Mini that not only took their fancy but provided them with success in motorsport. This caused their involvement in spares for the model and led to the founding of Mini Sport in 1967.

Junior Jockeys

For literally decades the old car world has vexed over its potential longevity – what will happen when the current generations of owners have popped their clogs? Will anybody be interested in our cars? Motoring Classics decided to investigate current views and what, if any, relevant action was being taken by the classic car clubs and related organisations. The results were encouraging…

Classic Character: Major Anthony Peter Roylance ‘Tony’ Rolt MC & Bar (1918-2008)

For a man of such accomplishment and personal presence, Tony Rolt’s extraordinary life has remained remarkably unpublicised. At the tender age of 20 he won the 200-mile British Empire Trophy race at Donington in the immortal ERA ‘Remus’, eliciting ‘boy wonder’ headlines as a result. His astonishing war record included seven escape attempts and he was a mastermind behind the famously audacious Colditz glider.

Full Steam Ahead

How about this for a Trivial Pursuit question – what weighs 96.25 tons, is 70ft long, can travel at 100mph and has covered some 2.5 million miles? Answer – arguably the most famous steam locomotive ever built, the immortal Flying Scotsman that, following a record £4.2 million restoration, is taking to the tracks once more.

Motoring Classics in Motorsport

British Motor Heritage MD John Yea previews the season ahead.

Micro-Mania and Britain’s only Bubble Car Museum

In these relatively affluent times, Britain’s best-selling car is the Ford Fiesta, priced from £10,145. Even those with considerably more modest budgets can still purchase a brand newfive-seat saloon – it’s called a Dacia Sandero and will set you back from just £5,995. Coupled with interest rates at a record low, this means safe, comfortable motoring has arguably never been more available to the masses. The early post-war picture was, however, as different as chalk from the proverbial chunk of cheddar…

(Longtime) Missing Moniker: Borgward

At last year’s Frankfurt Motorshow the grandson of Borgward’s founder heralded the return of this once prominent German marque that had lain dormant since being forced into liquidation in 1961. Its sudden demise was decidedly controversial, and sad too – it had produced over a million cars and at its zenith employed some 23,000 people.

7 – The Austin That Changed The World

With what do you most associate the digit 7? Historically speaking it is, of course: the number of deadly sins, wonders of the ancient world, continents, and days of the week. Perhaps less well known is that, since the 707 of 1957, all Boeing aircraft model names have both begun and ended in 7. In automotive terms, it was not only the favourite racing numeral of Sir Stirling Moss but has represented an ongoing range of BMW cars and specific models for both Lotus and Austin.

News From BMH

Managing Director John Yea reveals all.

About British Motor Heritage
British Motor Heritage

British Motor Heritage Limited was established in 1975 to support owners and the marketplace by putting genuine components for classic British cars back into manufacture, using original tools wherever possible. Since 2001, when the company was acquired from BMW, it has been successfully run as an independently owned company.

British Motor Heritage is the largest organisation of its type in the world. With access to unparalleled knowledge, authentic production information and original drawings and patterns, the company manufactures previously unobtainable body parts for British classic cars.

It occupies a unique position since it assembles 32 derivatives of body shells and has built total production volume of over 7,000 for the MGB, MGR V8, MG Midget, Austin-Healey Sprite, Triumph TR6, Original Mini and Mini Clubman using original press tools and assembly jigs.

Website: https://www.bmh-ltd.com/

Tex Automotive

Tex Motor Accessories have been manufactured in England for over fifty years, and many of our products are still produced in our factory in Witney on the original tooling.

Since their first appearance on British cars in 1947, Tex products evolved over the years to keep in step with changing car designs. The current range includes wipers and mirrors that were original equipment on a huge range of Austin, Ford, Morris, MG, Triumph, Vauxhall, etc. from 1974 to 1983.

Tex are also major distributors of the Renovo car care product range (specialising in hood refurbishment) and Samco Silicone hose Kits.

Website: https://texautomotive.com/

Copyright Information

Motoring Classics is the printed and online publication of British Motor Heritage and its retail trading arm.

Motoring Classics reproduction in whole or any part of any text, photograph or illustration without written permission of the publisher is strictly prohibited.

The publisher makes every effort to ensure the magazine’s contents are correct but can accept no responsibility for any effects from errors or omissions.

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